Tusculum College Museum Studies Department

Current News and Activities

Coming in 2005...

Spring Education Programs - Reservations are now being taken for spring curriculum- based education program at the Doak House Museum. "Down the Garden Path," "Quill Ma rk & Ink Spot," "Toys and Games," and "Dig at the Doak's" have available dates on a first-call, first-serve basis. "Dig at the Doak's will once again have professional archeologists available to talk with students during May.

Through 2005 - Glimpses of Tusculum College exhibit



Tusculum College Department of Museum Studies recognizes volunteers

It was "Christmas in August" recently for volunteers at the Doak House Museum and the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library on the Tusculum College campus.

On Aug. 4, the Department of Museum Program and Studies, which operates the two museums on campus, hosted its annual volunteer appreciation luncheon, which had a "Christmas in August" theme.

Special recognition was given to Emily Doak for her generosity and dedication of her time, talents, and support for not only the two museums on campus, but also the Andrew Johnson Memorial Association, which supports the two museums. A collection of children's books are being donated to the Doak House Museum in Doak's honor and will be displayed with a plaque, noting her "generosity which has touched the lives of thousands of school children."

Lillian Taylor, president of the Andrew Johnson Memorial Association, described some of Doak's efforts on behalf of the museums, including her work with school groups visiting the museums for various education programs, support of the scholarship program for day camp participants, assistance in coordinating volunteer efforts at the Andrew Johnson Museum, and service as the membership chairman of the Andrew Johnson Memorial Association. Doak is the wife of Capt. Sam Doak, a Tusculum trustee and a direct descendent of the co-founders of the college.

Doak encourages both museum volunteers and association members in their efforts and helps create an atmosphere of fellowship and camaraderie among the volunteers, Taylor said. "Emily is the spirit of the memorial association," she added. "It has been a joy to work with her this many years." Leanette Coyne, a long-time volunteer at the Doak House Museum, was also presented a special gift by the museum staff for her service, particularly in the "Storytelling & Gingerbread" educational program.

The group of volunteers were thanked for their efforts by Tusculum College President Dolphus E. Henry. The museums are a significant outreach to the community for the college, Dr. Henry said, noting that the number of school children participating in educational programs at the museums has increased from 1,500 five years ago to more than 12,000 in the last academic year.

In addition to expressing appreciation to the volunteers, George Collins, director of the Museum Studies Department, shared some of the latest developments at the museums, including one of the outgrowths of archeological field schools that have been held on the Doak House Museum site. Research into the origins of plate shards discovered during the archeological dig found that the plate, dating from the 1800s, had been made by a company in England, Collins said, and the Museum Shop will soon have dinnerware sets in the same attractive design available.

The Doak House Museum, which was the home of the Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak, co-founder of the college, offers a variety of educational programs related to the 19th century and Character Counts. The Andrew Johnson Museum, located in the oldest academic building on campus, houses a collection of books, papers, and memorabilia of the 17th president of the United States. The museum also houses the Charles Coffin Collection from the original college library and the College archives containing documents related to the history of Tusculum. The museums are also two of the 10 structures on the Tusculum campus in the National Registry Historic District.



Local teachers learn about educational resources at Doak House Museum

Dr. Donal Sexton shares his knowledge about sources of historical information during inservice training for teachers at the Doak House Museum on the Tusculum College campus.

The focus for the session taught by Dr. Sexton, who recently retired after 40 years of service as a history professor at Tusculum, was materials that can be used as primary source materials in National History Day submissions.

The Department of Museum Program and Studies coordinates National History Day events for grades 6-8 in Northeast Tennessee. During the inservice training, held July 25 and 26, teachers also had the opportunity to learn about the educational programs offered throughout the year at the Doak House Museum. Last year, the museum hosted about 10,000 school children from East Tennessee for the programs, related to the 19th century and Character Counts.



Dodworth Saxhorn Band performs at Doak House Museum

The Dodworth Saxhorn Band performed for Upward Bound students at the Doak House Museum.

The band later performed at Greeneville's Niswonger Performing Arts Center and at Pioneer Park before a Greeneville Astro's Game

The band is known as "America's Premier 19th century Brass Band."

The performances featured 19th century Patriotic music to celebrate Flag Day and the Fourth of July.

Visit the Dodworth Saxhorn Band website


Archeological dig at Doak House Museum yields some answers, new questions

Just yards from where a highway crew is moving massive mounds of dirt to widen a bridge, students from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga have dug into the soil just centimeters at a time at the Doak House Museum.

"The more you dig, the more questions come up," says Dr. Nicholas Honerkamp, who led the third archeological field school held during the month of May at the museum on the Tusculum College campus. Honerkamp is professor of anthropology and acting head of the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Geography at UTC.

Arriving on site May 9, the students and Dr. Honerkamp had two focuses - to further explore earlier findings of a double-sided fireplace near the Tusculum Academy building on site and of an area of demolished building materials in front of the existing Doak House structure, which was the home of Tusculum College co-founder, the Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak. The existence of the two buildings was unknown until the archeological findings were made.

During last year's archeological field school, a T-shaped brick foundation of a double-sided fireplace was discovered near the Academy, a finding that further intrigued Dr. Honerkamp because of a letter that at the time had only been recently discovered in which Rev. Doak spoke of student dormitories but did not indicate any existed on site.

This year, pits were dug to see if any traces of a building could be found at the dimensions recorded in the letter, Dr. Honerkamp reported recently to the Andrew Johnson Memorial Association.

As the students dug into the ground in short, precisely measured increments, they found indications of a building with a "suspicious alignment," Dr. Honerkamp said.

The building was exactly aligned to the Tusculum Academy structure, he continued. Bricks or "robber's trenches" were found to indicate the building was the 30 by 15 feet in size the Rev. Doak had described in the letter.

The "robber's trenches" were places in the earth that showed indications that brick had once been there although no traces of material were found. "When the dormitory went down, the bricks were re-used, which was not uncommon," he said.

When the evidences of the building had been first found, Dr. Honerkamp surmised that it could be either the original Academy building or a student dormitory.

It is more likely the student dormitory, he said, based on the further findings of the building elements that match Rev. Doak's description of his proposed student housing and the shards of earthen pottery that were commonly used for household utensils that have also been found.

The structure may have also adjoined the academy, Dr. Honerkamp said, pointing to the alignment and an old photo of the original Academy in which the outlines of a door can be seen in the outer wall which would have adjoined the dormitory. The existing Academy building is a replica of the original.

Additional test pits have been dug along the same line to see if traces of other dormitories could be found, Dr. Honerkamp said. In these pits, the students found evidence of extensive plowing as shown in the crisscrossing of the plow lines, he continued.

Further down in the earth, some areas of building demolition were found in semi-circular shapes without much pattern. Dr. Honerkamp said there are two possibilities of the source of this material - remnants of a chimney or, the more likely, a root cellar under a small building.

The students have also been digging in the area of a find from the first archeological field school in 2003, in which a large amount of demolition fill had been found in a pit dug in front of the Doak House.

This year, a pit encompassing part of the original pit and an adjacent area has been created, but the students dug down at smaller increments, five centimeters at a time, Dr. Honerkamp said.

More brick fragments, other building materials, and pieces of refined dinnerware have been discovered, he said, still leaving the question of the origins of all this material.

The unevenness of what appears to be the floor has led Dr. Honerkamp to surmise that a basement has been discovered and the building material may be the remains of a house the Doaks lived in while the existing structure was being constructed.

Each year, the pit dug in this area has only yielded artifacts from the period of Rev. Doak. "I thought maybe a modern nail could have seeped deeper down, but there have not been any artifacts found dating after 1870," he said. "I still think it is a basement, but it was a basement for a large building because we have not found an edge yet."


Doak House Museum hosts over 600 children for 'Down the Garden Path: Lessons from the Lawn' program

The Doak House Museum, one of two museums on the campus of Tusculum College, hosted more than 600 school children on Friday, May 13, for the "Down the Garden Path: Lessons from the Lawn" educational program.

The program attracted children and teachers from Greene County, Cocke County, Washington County and Johnson City schools. The Tennessee curriculum based program featured life science standards of student investigation of how living things interact with one another and the study of basic parts of plants, and how plants produce food.

Featured storyteller, herbalist, and naturalist for the day was Doug Elliott from North Carolina, who presented folk stories and harmonica music. Other storytellers included Linda Polland, resident storyteller from Jonesborough, and Martha Whaley, director of the Medical Museum at East Tennessee State University, who explained to the children how herbs were used for medical treatments.

Julia Thie, a master gardener from Kingsport, along with the assistance of the children, planted corn in the garden at the Doak House. The East Side Garden Club of Greeneville provided plants for the herb beds, and talked with the students about different types of plants and flowers located in the beds. The U.S. Forest Service provided information on trees and how to protect the environment. Tusculum College education students, under the direction of Dr. Jeannie Rademacher's Reading and Children's Literature class, read books such as "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" by Eric Carle and "Flower Garden" by Eve Bunting to the students.

More than 30 volunteers assisted with the event. Volunteers ran 22 learning stations where children were read stories, planted flowers and corn, and made craft items such as butterflies, ladybugs, and flowers.

Sponsorship and contributions were provided by The East Tennessee Foundation, Greeneville Oil, The East Side Garden Club, Tusculum College Education classes, Dr. Bob Davis, Master Gardener Program, Storytellers, Museum Volunteers, Museum Studies students, the U.S. Forestry Service, ETSU Museum at Mountain Home, and last but not least, Tusculum College Facilities Department.



Museums of Tusculum College receive state tourism award for promotional poster

The Museums of Tusculum College received a Merit Award for its advertising poster at the eighth annual Pinnacle Awards sponsored by the Northeast Tennessee Tourism Association.

The awards were presented May 11 at the Meadow View Marriott Conference Resort in Kingsport. The Pinnacle Awards Program recognizes organizations and businesses in Northeast Tennessee that are peak performers in promoting tourism and participation in cultural events.

The award-winning full color poster features the museum education programs offered through the Doak House Museum and President Andrew Johnson Museum & Library, which are located on the campus of Tusculum College. The poster also includes images of the college's historic museums, children engaged in various learning activities, and information on the college's undergraduate program in Museum Studies.

Five thousand of the posters were distributed to teachers throughout East Tennessee for year-around use in their classrooms, and to other supporting institutions. The advertising poster led to a 40 percent increase in calls for program reservations and a 57 percent increase in museum shop sales.

Susan Whittaker, the state commissioner of tourism who attended the awards presentation, said that the Museums of Tusculum poster directed at teachers was a creative approach to not only market the museums' education programs, but also promote the rich heritage of East Tennessee.

The award was presented to Cindy Lucas, associate director of the Department of Museum Program and Studies - director of the Doak House Museum and George Collins, department director.

The poster also received an "Award of Excellence" from the Tennessee Association of Museums at their annual meeting in March.


Andrew Johnson Memorial Association Supports Museum Studies Student

Andrew Johnson Memorial Association members Emily Doak, left, and Joy Seher, right, present an intern scholarship to Wanda Rahm, center, a senior at Tusculum College double majoring in Museum Studies and Visual Arts.

Rahm, of Greeneville, has received an internship at the Smithsonian Institution's Cooper-Hewitt Museum of Design in New York City.

The graded internship is a requirement for Rahm's degree in Museum Studies.

The Andrew Johnson Memorial Association is the volunteer support group for the Museums of Tusculum College and contributes to archival work at the President Andrew Johnson Museum & Library as well as to the numerous educational programs offered there and at the Doak House Museum.




19th century toys featured in display at Andrew Johnson Museum and Library

What do a high-wheeled tricycle, a set of New Testament playing cards, a Town Ball, and a printed doll have in common?

They are all on display as part of the exhibit of Toys and Games of the 19th Century exhibit, "Time for Play," at the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library on the Tusculum College campus. The exhibit will be on display through July. The exhibit has also been coordinated with the "Toys and Games of the 19th Century" educational program offered for school children at the Doak House Museum, also located on the Tusculum campus.

The broadening philosophy towards children's play in the 19th century is reflected in the display, which features toys that taught children practical skills or religious or moral lessons as well as those for amusement or physical activity.

In the early 1800s, the prevalent belief was reflected in a book, "Essays on the Duty of Parents and Children," (on display in the exhibit) which states that parents are obligated to keep their families industrious and that while parents should allow "their children reasonable time for relaxation, exercise, or innocent amusement," they should also make sure their children are learning, particularly religious lessons, and not allow their children to be idle and contract bad habits.

Learning is the focus of some of the items in the exhibit, including a puzzle map of the United States, a New Testament Game using playing cards, child-sized tools, and a wooden Noah's Ark with animals.

The home is the focus of other toys including miniature tea and kitchen sets, dolls, and reproduction samplers used to teach young girls not only embroidery but also numbers and letters.

With the arrival of more immigrants to the country who did not share the early settlers abhorrence of play and the medical communities encouragement of physical play for the healthy development of children, beliefs about play began to change by the mid-1800s.

Outdoor play is represented in the display by a high-wheeled tricycle, a hopscotch board, a marble ring, a kite, and a reproduction Town Ball and Bat. Town Ball was the predecessor to baseball and featured a softer ball and smaller bat. Visitors can also try their hand at playing marbles or play with period reproduction dolls.

The display has been made possible with the support of Berea College, East Tennessee Historical Society, Mrs. Mary Belle Jenkins, and the Tennessee State Museum.

Also on exhibit in the museum is a display providing "Glimpses of Tusculum College." The exhibit features items spanning the college's 211-year history, including some of the oldest books in the school's original library, early scientific equipment, a 1855 map of the United States, and numerous photographs.

Please call (423) 636-7348 to check the hours of the museum on the Tusculum campus. The museum is generally open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays, but observes college holidays and block breaks.


Doak House Museum wins Award of Excellence

The Doak House Museum at Tusculum College was presented a "2004 Award of Excellence" during a recent meeting of the Tennessee Association of Museums.

The award, presented during the Tennessee Association of Museums' annual meeting, recognized a classroom poster created last year to inform educators about the programs at the museum on the Tusculum College campus.

The poster received the award in the "Flat Paper Publications" category for small museums. The Tennessee Association of Museums awards program was formed to recognize excellence within the activities of the state's museum community.

Five thousand teachers, librarians, principals, and educators in Northeast Tennessee received the classroom poster, which served as both a resource of information about the Doak House Museum's educational programs and a remainder of the museum as an educational outlet for students.

The educational programming at the Doak House Museum focuses on various aspects of education and life during the 19th century at the site, which was the home of the Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak, co-founder of the college. These programs served about 10,000 school children from East Tennessee last year.

The poster raised awareness of the museum as indicated by a 40 percent increase in phone calls inquiring about the educational programs, a 12 percent increase in museum visitation, and a 57 percent increase in gift shop sales.

The museum staff is appreciative of this recognition by their professional peers across the state for their outstanding accomplishments and services offered to the Tennessee community.

The Department of Museum Program and Studies administers the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library and the Doak House Museum on the Tusculum campus under the direction of George Collins, director of Museum Program and Studies, and Cindy Lucas, associate director of the Doak House Museum and the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library.

The department also offers one of the few undergraduate degree programs in museum studies in the country. The Andrew Johnson Museum houses a collection of books, papers, and memorabilia of the 17th president of the United States. The museum also houses the Charles Coffin Collection from the original college library and the College archives containing documents related to the history of Tusculum. The Doak House Museum, which was the home of the Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak, co-founder of the college, hosted about 10,000 school children from East Tennessee last year for a variety of educational programs related to the 19th century and Character Counts.


Doak House Museum hosts day camp for home-schooled students

Making a butterfly decoration was one of the activities during an enrichment day camp for home-schooled students held March 1-4 at the Doak House Museum.

Twenty-three children from Northeast Tennessee participated in "Investigating History," the annual quality enrichment day camp.

During the camp, the participants, ages 5-12, had the opportunity to learn what life was like in the 19th century through investigation of artifacts, crafts, stories, gardening, insects and plants of the period.

The hands-on activities during the camp included analyzing artifacts found in past archeological digs at the Doak House Museum site. The day camp is one of the many educational programs at the Doak House Museum, the home of Tusculum College co-founder the Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak.

The museum provides seasonal educational programs throughout the year, focusing on life in the 19th century and Character Counts. For more information about the Doak House Museum and its educational programs, call (423) 636-8554 or 1-800-729-0256 ext. 5251.


Regional History Day held Feb. 25 at Doak Elementary School

Students from four Greene County Schools participated in a Regional National History Day event on Feb. 25 at Doak Elementary School.

Students in sixth through eighth grade displayed their exhibits, performed their self-written plays, and presented a documentary focusing on this year's National History Day theme of "Communication in History: the Key to Understanding." The students were from Chuckey-Doak Middle School and Baileyton, Glenwood, and McDonald elementary schools.

This is the first year that a Regional National History Day event has been held in Greene County. Tusculum College's Department of Museum Program and Studies coordinated the event. The department has worked closely for three years with Mosheim School in its National History Day activities, and that school has had students advance to the national competition for the past three years. Both the regional and Mosheim National History Day activities have been supported financially by contributions by the Andrew Johnson Memorial Association.

Winners in each category and grade level may advance to a district competition to be held in Knoxville this month.

Placing in the individual exhibit category were the following: Eighth grade - 1st place - "Do You Hear What I Hear" by Chelsea Jones from Glenwood; 2nd place - "History of the Radio" by Tyler Robinson from Glenwood; and 3rd place - "Songs of American Soldiers" by Elizabeth Metcalf from Glenwood. Seventh grade - 1st place - "Degenerate Art of Nazi Germany" by Nadareh Naseri from Chuckey-Doak. Sixth grade - 2nd place - "The Price to Be Free" by Josh Hensley from Baileyton.

In the sixth- and seventh-grade group exhibit category, first place went to "New Generation" by Brianne Miller and Zachary McKinney from McDonald; and second place went to "Raise Your Voice" by Lindsey Ockerman and Christian Black of Chuckey-Doak.

First place in the performance category was the play, "Flapper Culture," by Rebecca Gregory, Sarah Orr, David Parham, Brooke Johnson, and Jordan Tipton from Glenwood. Second place was "Ann and Hanneli" by Tori Shelton and Jessica Peedin from Glenwood.

In the documentary category, second place was awarded to "Andrew Johnson" by Cody Christie, Dustin Wilhoit, and Jacob Blagg from Glenwood.

Teachers of the participating students were Linda Hensley, Bailetyton and Chuckey-Doak; Terry Beets, Glenwood; and Amanda Waits, McDonald.

Winners from the district level go on to compete at the state level, with the state winners advancing to the national competition to be held at the University of Maryland.

This year marks the 25th year for the national competition. The program began in 1974 with a history fair in Cleveland, Ohio, and quickly expanded to other states. In 1980 the first national contest was held in Washington, D.C., and since then, National History Day has grown to include an annual participation of more than 600,000 students and 40,000 teachers from across the country.

National History Day is a private, nonprofit organization created through a coalition of state History Day programs. Each state has a state coordinator who is affiliated with a museum, historical association, or some other educational institution.

The mission of National History Day is to improve the teaching and learning of history in elementary and secondary schools so that students become better prepared, knowledgeable citizens. The fundamental purpose of the program is to reform the way history is taught and learned by challenging students through the contest to conduct meaningful historical inquiries.

For more information about National History Day, contact George Collins at Tusculum College by telephone at 1-423-636-7348 or 1-800-729-0256, or by mail at P.O. Box 5026, Greeneville, Tennessee 37743.


Local winners named in National History Day event held at Mosheim School in Greene County on Jan. 21

Winners in National History Day 2005 activities at Greene County's Mosheim School were named Jan. 21 by a team of judges who evaluated entries ranging from written papers to p anelboard exhibits, dramatic presentations, and historical documentaries created in PowerPoint.

Judges came from across East Tennessee and were invited to participate by George Collins, director of Museum Programs at Tusculum College, and Cindy Lucas, associate director of the college's Museum program and the Doak House Museum on the campus.

This is the fourth year that the Tusculum College department has worked closely with Mosheim School in its National History Day activities. With support and guidance from teac hers at the school as well as the Tusculum College department, a group of Mosheim students has advanced in each of the three prior years to national level competition with self-w ritten and performed plays.

This year, participating Mosheim students in the sixth-through-eighth grade levels created works on the theme of "Communication in History: the Key to Understanding." The top entries as selected by the judges now advance to a district competition hosted by the East Tennessee Historical Society in Knoxville. District winners then compete at the state level. State winners advance to the national competition to be held at the University of Maryland.

Listed below are the winners in the Mosheim event, giving by grade, then category of the entry, name of the entry, and name(s) of the student(s):

Eighth Grade:
Exhibit category: first place: "The Progression of Communications Over the Years," Amber Dykes; second place: "The Heart's Written Tears," Mayla Portugal; third place: "Helen Kel ler - Challenge to Communicate," Heather Justice.
Performance/Individual category: first place: "Ann Sullivan," Ayla Taylor.
Performance/Group category: first place: "War Letters," Caitlin Dean, Courtney Dean, Mariah Kilday, Bobby Pinata and Jordan Ward. Second place: "Navajo Code Talkers," Kalys ta Jones, Jessica Sexton, Nathan Smith, Philip Hicks, Justin Redfern; and third place: "Hanoi Hilton," Ryan Witt, Cole Thorne, Jill Starnes, Kassie Owens, Hannah Staniland.
Historical Paper category: first place: "Hitler Propaganda," Trey Willis; second place: "The Life of Helen Keller," Kassie McCamey.
Documentary category: second place: "Correspondence of the Gulf War," Dalton Lamb, Josh Ricker.

Seventh grade:
Exhibit category: first place: "Keeping In Touch," Courtney Malone, Savannah Faurat; second place: "The Pony Express," Ronald Ramsey.

Sixth grade:
Documentary category: first place: "The Bubonic Plague," Kari Beth Isbell, Sarah Clark, Brooklyn Thorne, Jacklyn Hensley.
Exhibit category: first place: "Trade Talk: Plains Sign Language," Peta Merzlak; second place: "Helen Keller: A Light in the Darkness," Shaylee Tell, Alison Willis; third pla ce: "American Sign Language," Tyler Huff.
Historical Paper category: third place: "Sign Language," Matthew Brobeck.

The Department of Museum Program and Studies at Tusculum College is serving as the National History Day coordinator for the Northeast Tennessee region for the 2004-05 academic year.

The regional National History Day competition will be held on Feb. 25 at Doak Elementary School in Greene County and is open to all schools, grades 6-12, in Northeast Tennesse e.

The top projects in each category and grade level advance to a district competition hosted by the East Tennessee Historical Society in Knoxville, with those winners going on t o compete at the state level. State winners then advance to the national competition to be held at the University of Maryland.

This year marks the 25th year for the national competition. The program began in 1974 with a history fair in Cleveland, Ohio, and quickly expanded to other states. In 1980 the first national contest was held in Washington, D.C., and since then, National History Day has grown to include an annual participation of more than 600,000 students and 40,000 t eachers from across the country.

National History Day is a private, nonprofit organization created through a coalition of state History Day programs. Each state has a state coordinator who is affiliated with a museum, historical association, or some other educational institution. The mission of National History Day is to improve the teaching and learning of history in elementary and secondary schools so that students become better prepared, knowledgeable citizens. The fundamental purpose of the program is to reform the way history is taught and learned by challenging students through the contest to conduct meaningful historical i nquiries.

For more information about National History Day, contact George Collins at Tusculum College by telephone at 1-423-636-7348 or 1-800-729-0256, or by mail at P.O. Box 5026, Gree neville, Tennessee 37743.


Tusculum College Vintage Athletic Posters for sale in Doak House Museum Shop


The posters are $8.00 each or $24.00 for all four. They are available now in the Doak House Museum Shop.


The Museums of Tusculum College host teacher in-service

Greene County Teachers

Teachers from the Greene County School System make cloth scarecrows during an in-service Wednesday, July 28, at the Doak House Museum on the Tusculum College camp us.

The museums' in-service program acquaints teachers not only with the educational programs offered to school students during the academic year, which include hands-on activities such as making the scarecrow, but also how the museums tell the history of the college and the role of education in the region during the 1800s.

The Doak House Museum and the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library are operated by the college's Department of Museum Program and Studies. The Doak House Museum hosted about 9,000 school children last year for educational programs about life in the 1800s.



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The Museums of Tusculum College
E-Mail: George Collins - gcollins@tusculum.edu